Is the global temperature record credible?

Strengthen transparency in regulatory science

“Scientific studies should be reproducible—especially if they are used to justify government regulations. But NAS’s report, The Irreproducibility Crisis of Modern Science, released earlier this year, found that many supposedly scientific results cannot be reproduced in subsequent investigations.

We believe that individual scientists, the federal government, and state legislatures must take steps to promote reliable, reproducible science. And we believe that all Americans should be equipped with basic statistics and other tools to recognize faulty science when they see it.” click here

Paris climate deal makes “grand promises” that will not have a lasting benefit

” “Here’s a United Nations climate report that environmentalists probably don’t want anybody to read. It says that even if every country abides by the grand promises they made last year in Paris to reduce greenhouse gases, the planet would still be “doomed.” ” click here

New York City will soon be underwater, Not!

Nils-Axel. The Illusive Flooding of New York CityJournal of Environmental Sciences Volume 1, Issue 2 

In media we often hear frightening stories of a sea in the progress of rapidly rising and flooding low-lying coasts and islands, and coastal cities like New York. This paper is devoted to a scientific evaluation of evidence-based facts versus fake news that violates facts and physical laws. It is a serious mistake to claim that global sea level is in a phase of rapid rise. Observationally based facts document a present changes in absolute (eustatic) sea level ranging between ±0.0 and +1.0 mm/yr. This poses no threats what so ever. In New York City, sea level is rising at a rate of +2.84 mm/yr, which would imply an additional rise in sea level by 23.3 cm by 2100, a modest rise that can be handled without problems. There also occur statements that sea level may raise by 1 m or more by 2100. All such claims represent fake news that does not concur with observational fact and violates physical frames of realism.

Wind turbines are a serious threat to predatory birds

“Wind turbines are the world’s new ‘apex predators’, wiping out buzzards, hawks and other carnivorous birds at the top of the food chain, say scientists. A study of wind farms in India found that predatory bird numbers drop by three quarters in areas around the turbines. This is having a ‘ripple effect’ across the food chain, with small mammals and reptiles adjusting their behaviour as their natural predators disappear from the skies.” click here

More climate science skepticism needed.

Within a matter of days after the press release for a newly published Nature paper spewed the usual it’s-worse-than-we-thought headlines throughout the alarmosphere (Washington Post BBC, New York Times), the paper’s results were assessed to have “major problems” by an author of multiple CO2 climate sensitivity papers (Lewis and Curry, 2015)click here

“…published peer-reviewed scientific literature…has scientific flaws…”

Piers Larcombea,b,⁎ , Peter Riddc The need for a formalised system of Quality Control for environmental policy-science Marine Pollution Bulletin 126 (2018) 449–461

Research science used to inform public policy decisions, herein defined as “Policy-Science”, is rarely subjected to rigorous checking, testing and replication. Studies of biomedical and other sciences indicate that a considerable fraction of published peer-reviewed scientific literature, perhaps half, has significant flaws. To demonstrate the potential failings of the present approaches to scientific Quality Control (QC), we describe examples of science associated with perceived threats to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. There appears a serious risk of efforts to improve the health of the GBR being directed inefficiently and/or away from the more serious threats. We suggest the need for a new organisation to undertake quality reviews and audits of important scientific results that underpin government spending decisions on the environment. Logically, such a body could also examine policy science in other key areas where governments rely heavily upon scientific results, such as education, health and criminology.