Daily Archives: November 11, 2014

USEPA Air Rule Benefits are on Paper Only, Not Reality

This Washington Post writer is like the vast majority of people who live or work inside I-495 Washington DC beltway bubble fantasy land Mr. Toles has no clue how the government regulatory world and the iron rice bowl really works nor the difference between rhetoric and science.

The benefits supposedly attributed to the USEPA carbon doxide rules are on paper only. The science says otherwise in reality.  Neither the USEPA carbon dioxide rules, nor blaming the GOPers (which I am not) will have any impact on addressing the real issues regarding changes in climate. It just simply continues the charade that is typical of government agencies like USEPA.

Variability in Ocean Surface Temperatures, Inaccurate Models

In dressed up scientific language this paper is simply saying climate models and observations do not match. But we knew that…

Thomas Laepple und Peter Huybers.  Ocean surface temperature variability: Large model-data differences at decadal and longer periods. PNAS DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1412077111 

The variability of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) at multidecadal and longer timescales is poorly constrained, primarily because instrumental records are short and proxy records are noisy. Through applying a new noise filtering technique to a global network of late Holocene SST proxies, we estimate SST variability between annual and millennial timescales. Filtered estimates of SST variability obtained from coral, foraminifer, and alkenone records are shown to be consistent with one another and with instrumental records in the frequency bands at which they overlap. General circulation models, however, simulate SST variability that is systematically smaller than instrumental and proxy-based estimates. Discrepancies in variability are largest at low latitudes and increase with timescale, reaching two orders of magnitude for tropical variability at millennial timescales. This result implies major deficiencies in observational estimates or model simulations, or both, and has implications for the attribution of past variations and prediction of future change.

The full article is here (fee).

 

H.R.5659 — Water Supply Cost Savings Act

Water Supply Cost Savings Act or the Savings Act – Requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to: (1) update their programs that provide drinking water technical assistance by including information on cost-effective, innovative, and alternative drinking water delivery systems; and (2) disseminate information on the cost effectiveness of wells and well systems to communities and nonprofit organizations seeking federal funding for drinking water systems serving small communities (3,300 or fewer persons).

Requires applicants for federal grants or loans for those drinking water systems to certify that wells have been considered as an alternative drinking water supply.

H.R.5659 — Savings Act (Introduced in House – IH)HR 5659 IH

113th CONGRESS2d SessionH. R. 5659To reduce Federal, State, and local costs of providing high-quality drinking water to millions of Americans residing in rural communities by facilitating greater use of cost-effective well water systems, and for other purposes.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVESSeptember 18, 2014Mr. STUTZMAN introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILLTo reduce Federal, State, and local costs of providing high-quality drinking water to millions of Americans residing in rural communities by facilitating greater use of cost-effective well water systems, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the `Water Supply Cost Savings Act’ or the `Savings Act’.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

Congress finds that–

(1) the United States is facing a drinking water infrastructure funding crisis; the Environmental Protection Agency (the `EPA’) projects a $384 billion shortfall in funding over the next 20 years; and this funding challenge is particularly acute in rural America;

(2) there are 52,000 community water systems in the United States, of which 41,801 are small community water systems;

(3) EPA’s most recent Drinking Water Needs Survey placed the shortfall in drinking water infrastructure funding for small communities (3,300 or fewer persons) at $64.5 billion;

(4) small communities often cannot finance the construction and maintenance of drinking water systems because the cost per resident for this investment would be prohibitively expensive;

(5) drought conditions have placed significant strains on existing surface water supplies, and many communities across the country are now considering the use of groundwater and community well systems to provide drinking water; and

(6) 42 million Americans receive their drinking water from individual wells, and millions more rely upon community well systems for their drinking water.

SEC. 3. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

It is the sense of the Congress that–

(1) providing rural communities with the knowledge and resources necessary to fully utilize wells and community well systems can save local, State, and Federal governments and taxpayers billions of dollars over the next two decades;

(2) wells and community well systems can provide safe and affordable drinking water to millions of Americans; and

(3) the Federal Government lacks the resources to finance the drinking water infrastructure needs of millions of citizens residing in rural America, and wells and community well systems can help significantly to close this funding gap.

SEC. 4. DRINKING WATER TECHNOLOGY CLEARINGHOUSE.

The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Secretary of Agriculture shall–

(1) update existing programs of the Agency and the Department of Agriculture designed to provide drinking water technical assistance to include information on cost-effective, innovative, and alternative drinking water delivery systems, including systems that are supported by wells; and

(2) disseminate information on the cost effectiveness of wells and well systems to communities and not-for-profit organizations seeking Federal funding for drinking water systems serving 3,300 or fewer persons.

SEC. 5. WATER SYSTEM ASSESSMENT.

In any application for a Federal grant or loan for a drinking water system serving 3,300 or fewer persons, a unit of local government or not-for-profit organization shall certify that it has considered, as an alternative drinking water supply, drinking water delivery systems sourced by publicly owned individual wells, shared wells, and community wells.

SEC. 6. REPORT TO CONGRESS.

Not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Secretary of Agriculture shall report to Congress on–

(1) the utilization of innovative and alternative drinking water systems described in this Act;

(2) the range of cost savings for communities utilizing innovative and alternative drinking water systems described in this Act; and

(3) the utilization of drinking water technical assistance programs operated by the Agency and the Department.

 

Case Reports of Acute Fluoride Toxicity

Garg S, Dobhal A, Khanduri M, Mehra A. Case Reports Of Acute Fluoride Toxicity. Indian Journal of Dental Sciences; Dec2013, Vol. 5 Issue 5, p73-75

With the increased use of various fluoride preparations for caries prevention, all dental personnel should know their potential toxicity and the margins of safety associated with their use. If their use is abused, there is a risk of illness or even death. Frequent ingestion of low but excessive quantities of fluoride during the period of tooth formation can lead to dental fluorosis. Particular concern is warranted for the ingestion of fluoride-containing toothpastes by young children and the inappropriate use of dietary fluoride supplements in communities with sufficient fluoride already present in drinking water. Parents should brush the teeth of preschool children or, at the very least, dispense only small amounts of toothpaste for them (a pea-sized portion). In this article, two case reports of acute fluoride toxicity are discussed.