Monochloramie Loss Mechanisms in Tap Water

Zhang Evan G R Davies James Bolton Yang Liu Q. Monochloramine loss mechanisms in tap water. Water Environ Res. 2017 Mar 1. doi: 10.2175/106143017X14902968254421.

Chloramination has been widely applied for drinking water disinfection, with monochloramine (NH₂Cl) the dominant chloramine species. However, under neutral pH, NH₂Cl can autodecompose and react with chemical components in drinking water, thus decreasing disinfection efficiency. In tap water, the NH₂Cl loss rate can be influenced by temperature, pH, Cl/N molar ratio, the initial NH₂Cl concentration and the natural organic matter (NOM) concentration. A good prediction of NH2Cl loss can assist in the operation of drinking water treatment plants. In this research, a kinetic rate constant (k_docr=(3.57 ± 0.54)×〖10〗^6 〖 M〗^(-1) h^(-1)) and a reactive site fraction (S = 0.43 ± 0.06) for the reaction between free chlorine released from NH₂Cl autodecoposition and tap water NOM were derived from a kinetic model to predict the NH₂Cl loss under various conditions. A temperature-dependent model was also developed. The model predictions match well with the experimental results, which demonstrates the validity of the model and provides a convenient and accurate method for NH₂Cl loss calculations.

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