Monthly Archives: July 2017

Worldwide Ocean Levels Have Fallen for Nearly 2 Years

“…NASA’s own data reveal that worldwide ocean levels have been falling for nearly two years,…” click here

Congress responsible for failing health care programs

Mr. John McCain, Ms. Susan Collins, and Ms. Lisa Murkowski have their cadillac health care paid for by US citizens. 

“President Trump took to Twitter Monday to ask why insurance companies and Congress are not being hurt by the failings of Obamacare just as the American people are being hit.” click here

Radiocesium in Cistern Waters, Croatian Coast

Franic Z, Marovic G, Petrinec B, Branica G. Post-Chernobyl Investigations of Radiocesium Activity Concentrations in Cistern Waters along the Croatian Coast of the Adriatic Sea. Health physics. 2017 Sep;113(3):167-174. doi: 10.1097/HP.0000000000000685.

The results of long-term investigations into the post-Chernobyl period of radiocesium activity concentrations in cistern waters along the Croatian coast of the Adriatic Sea are presented. The Cs activity concentrations in cistern water samples were in excellent correlation with fallout activities. The observed mean residence time of Cs in cistern waters was estimated to be 6.9 ± 0.8 y. Cesium-137 radioecological sensitivity for the period 1988-1997 for cistern water was estimated to be 1.17 × 10 Bq y L/(Bq m). The annual total effective dose incurred by Cs and Cs that a hypothetical adult person drinking 1 L of cistern water per day would receive was estimated to be < 1 mSv in 1986, decreasing to 3.6 μSv in 2015.

V. cholerae can survive in the river systems, Bangladesh

Grant SL, Tamason CC, Hoque BA, Jensen PK. Drinking cholera: salinity levels and palatability of drinking water in coastal Bangladesh. Trop Med Int Health. 2015 Apr;20(4):455-61. doi: 10.1111/tmi.12455. 

OBJECTIVES: To measure the salinity levels of common water sources in coastal Bangladesh and explore perceptions of water palatability among the local population to investigate the plausibility of linking cholera outbreaks in Bangladesh with ingestion of saline-rich cholera-infected river water.

METHODS: Hundred participants took part in a taste-testing experiment of water with varying levels of salinity. Salinity measurements were taken of both drinking and non-drinking water sources. Informal group discussions were conducted to gain an in-depth understanding of water sources and water uses.

RESULTS: Salinity levels of non-drinking water sources suggest that the conditions for Vibrio cholerae survival exist 7-8 days within the local aquatic environment. However, 96% of participants in the taste-testing experiment reported that they would never drink water with salinity levels that would be conducive to V. cholerae survival. Furthermore, salinity levels of participant’s drinking water sources were all well below the levels required for optimal survival of V. cholerae. Respondents explained that they preferred less salty and more aesthetically pleasing drinking water.

CONCLUSION: Theoretically, V. cholerae can survive in the river systems in Bangladesh; however, water sources which have been contaminated with river water are avoided as potential drinking water sources. Furthermore, there are no physical connecting points between the river system and drinking water sources among the study population, indicating that the primary driver for cholera cases in Bangladesh is likely not through the contamination of saline-rich river water into drinking water sources.

New York Times Article Misleading at Best, Fraudulent

“Every single claim in the article is patently false, and the exact opposite of reality. The authors intentionally started their study in a cold period, after the extreme heat of the 1930’s.” click here

Ground Water Quality in Vietnam

Le Luu T. Remarks on the current quality of groundwater in Vietnam. Environmental science and pollution research international. 2017 Jul 24. doi: 10.1007/s11356-017-9631-z.

This paper reviews the current quality of groundwater in Vietnam. In Vietnam, groundwater is obtained primarily from tubewells, which have high concentrations of pollutants such as As, Fe, Mn, and NH4+. In the areas where groundwater tests were conducted, arsenic levels ranged from 0.1-3050 μg/L, which substantially exceed the standard of 10 μg/L which has been established by the WHO. Contamination sources are distributed over a large area from the Red River Delta in the north to the Mekong River Delta in the south, putting as many as ten million people at risk of adverse health effects. Levels of arsenic and iron in sediment are strongly correlated, which indicate that the presence of arsenic in groundwater results from the reduction of arsenic bound to iron oxyhydroxides. It is important to raise awareness of these issues among the Vietnamese public by disseminating information about the negative effects of contaminated drinking water, as well as carrying out long-term research projects to identify other sources of contamination and improving water treatment technology and water management capabilities.

Improving Private-Well Water Quality, North Carolina

MacDonald Gibson J, Pieper KJ. Strategies to Improve Private-Well Water Quality: A North Carolina Perspective. Environmental health perspectives. 2017 Jul 7;125(7):076001. doi: 10.1289/EHP890.

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that the 44.5 million U.S. residents drawing their drinking water from private wells face higher risks of waterborne contaminant exposure than those served by regulated community water supplies. Among U.S. states, North Carolina (N.C.) has the second-largest population relying on private wells, making it a useful microcosm to study challenges to maintaining private-well water quality.

OBJECTIVES: This paper summarizes recommendations from a two-day summit to identify options to improve drinking-water quality for N.C. residents served by private wells.

METHODS: The Research Triangle Environmental Health Collaborative invited 111 participants with knowledge of private-well water challenges to attend the Summit. Participants worked in small groups that focused on specific aspects and reconvened in plenary sessions to formulate consensus recommendations.

DISCUSSION: Summit participants highlighted four main barriers to ensuring safe water for residents currently relying on private wells: (1) a database of private well locations is unavailable; (2) racial disparities have perpetuated reliance on private wells in some urbanized areas; (3) many private-well users lack information or resources to monitor and maintain their wells; and (4) private-well support programs are fragmented and lack sufficient resources. The Summit produced 10 consensus recommendations for ways to overcome these barriers.

CONCLUSIONS: The Summit recommendations, if undertaken, could improve the health of North Carolinians facing elevated risks of exposure to waterborne contaminants because of their reliance on inadequately monitored and maintained private wells. Because many of the challenges in N.C. are common nationwide, these recommendations could serve as models for other states.