Monthly Archives: September 2018

Resist Judge Kavanaugh character assassination

“These are smears, pure and simple. And they debase our public discourse,” he wrote in a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee. “But they are also a threat to any man or woman who wishes to serve our country. Such grotesque and obvious character assassination — if allowed to succeed — will dissuade competent and good people of all political persuasions from service.” click here

Coastlines are expanding worldwide; Sea level not rising

Arjen Luijendijk, Gerben Hagenaars, Roshanka Ranasinghe, Fedor Baart, Gennadii Donchyts, Stefan Aarninkhof. The State of the World’s Beaches. Scientific Reports 8, 6641 (2018)

Coastal zones constitute one of the most heavily populated and developed land zones in the world. Despite the utility and economic benefits that coasts provide, there is no reliable global-scale assessment of historical shoreline change trends. Here, via the use of freely available optical satellite images captured since 1984, in conjunction with sophisticated image interrogation and analysis methods, we present a global-scale assessment of the occurrence of sandy beaches and rates of shoreline change therein. Applying pixel-based supervised classification, we found that 31% of the world’s ice-free shoreline are sandy. The application of an automated shoreline detection method to the sandy shorelines thus identified resulted in a global dataset of shoreline change rates for the 33 year period 1984–2016. Analysis of the satellite derived shoreline data indicates that 24% of the world’s sandy beaches are eroding at rates exceeding 0.5 m/yr, while 28% are accreting and 48% are stable. The majority of the sandy shorelines in marine protected areas are eroding, raising cause for serious concern.

Real climate data exposes misleading New York Times story

“Having built many climate datasets of Alabama, some starting as early as 1850, I knew the Times story was designed to create alarm and promote the claim that humans who use carbon-based energy (gasoline, natural gas, coal) to help them live better lives are making our summers ever more miserable.  Be aware reader, this webtool is not designed to provide accurate information.” click here

Climate variation due to natural factor enhancement

“The ‘pink-noise’ aspect of the analysis suggests that there may be some aspect of climate variation due to a naturally produced slow varying function which may be acting together with anthropogenic factors in a resonant fashion rather like an adult pushing a child on a swing just at the right moment can rapidly increase the amplitude of the swing.” click here

Climategate – the next episode from Arizona

“Nearly seven years ago, on December 7th, 2011, the Free Market Environmental Law Clinic’s (FME Law) sought public records from the University of Arizona related to the Mann-Bradley-Hughes temperature reconstruction that looks like a hockey stick, and development of an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report.  They refused much of the request and FME Law sued.  Now (on September 18th, 2018) legal counsel for the University informed FME Law that they were done, that they would be withdrawing their appeal of the trial court’s decision, end the case and disclose the records.” click here

Is there an underground carbon bomb waiting to blow up?

Suzanne B. Hodgkins et al. Tropical peatland carbon storage linked to global latitudinal trends in peat recalcitrance. Nature Communications. volume 9, A3640 (2018)

Peatlands represent large terrestrial carbon banks. Given that most peat accumulates in boreal regions, where low temperatures and water saturation preserve organic matter, the existence of peat in (sub)tropical regions remains enigmatic. Here we examined peat and plant chemistry across a latitudinal transect from the Arctic to the tropics. Near-surface low-latitude peat has lower carbohydrate and greater aromatic content than near-surface high-latitude peat, creating a reduced oxidation state and resulting recalcitrance. This recalcitrance allows peat to persist in the (sub)tropics despite warm temperatures. Because we observed similar declines in carbohydrate content with depth in high-latitude peat, our data explain recent field-scale deep peat warming experiments in which catotelm (deeper) peat remained stable despite temperature increases up to 9 °C. We suggest that high-latitude deep peat reservoirs may be stabilized in the face of climate change by their ultimately lower carbohydrate and higher aromatic composition, similar to tropical peats.

See WUWT for more discussion of this paper.

“Ignore the charges against Judge Kavanaugh”

“Dennis Prager writes in Townhall that judging Brett Kavanaugh on the basis of an unsubstantiated accusation about his behavior while in high school is indicative of the irrationality and lack of moral compass in our society:” click here