Monthly Archives: January 2019

Data tampering generates warming winters

“Heidi Cullen’s Climate Central released this fraudulent map showing Midwest winters getting hot, which is based on tampered thermometer data.” click here

The real State of the Union

“Mothers from around the country gave their version of the State of the Union at an event on Tuesday night in Washington, DC, claiming the nation is “in peril” because of left-wing policies that threaten American families and religious liberty.” click here

Water security will not happen without border-wall

“During a Tuesday House Armed Services Committee hearing with Under Secretary of Defense for Policy John Rood, Rood confirmed to Brooks that President Trump could use United States Code 10 (USC)§ 284 to build a wall along the border using the military.” click here

Arctic sea ice volume is increasing

“Arctic sea ice volume gain from January 1-23 has been second highest in the Danish Meteorological Institute record, just behind 2008.” click here  and here

Early twentieth century warming is poorly understood

Gabriele C. Hegerl, Stefan Brönnimann, Andrew Schurer, Tim Cowan. The early 20th century warming: Anomalies, causes, and consequences. WIREs Clim Change. 2018;9:e522. wires.wiley.com/climatechange

The most pronounced warming in the historical global climate record prior to the recent warming occurred over the first half of the 20th century and is known as the Early Twentieth Century Warming (ETCW). Understanding this period and the subsequent slowdown of warming is key to disentangling the relationship between decadal variability and the response to human influences in the present and future climate. This review discusses the observed changes during the ETCW and hypotheses for the underlying causes and mechanisms. Attribution studies estimate that about a half (40–54%; p > .8) of the global warming from 1901 to 1950 was forced by a combination of increasing greenhouse gases and natural forcing, offset to some extent by aerosols. Natural variability also made a large contribution, particularly to regional anomalies like the Arctic warming in the 1920s and 1930s. The ETCW period also encompassed exceptional events, several of which are touched upon: Indian monsoon failures during the turn of the cen- tury, the “Dust Bowl” droughts and extreme heat waves in North America in the 1930s, the World War II period drought in Australia between 1937 and 1945; and the European droughts and heat waves of the late 1940s and early 1950s. Under- standing the mechanisms involved in these events, and their links to large scale forcing is an important test for our understanding of modern climate change and for predicting impacts of future change.

Solar activity impacts global climate cycles

“In his presentation, the renowned Danish scientist showed how solar activity modulates the cosmic rays striking the atmosphere, and thus the climate-impacting cloud cover. Dr. Svensmark shows that there are powerful correlations worldwide between solar activity and climatic cycles, and so the sun is clearly playing a role in combination with the cosmic cloud-seeding rays. Hundreds of studies confirm this.” click here

Factual errors in Cheng et al. (2019) ocean warming paper

“There are a number of statements in Cheng et al. (2019) ‘How fast are the oceans warming’, (‘the paper’) that appear to be mistaken and/or potentially misleading. My analysis of these issues is followed by a reply from the paper’s authors: Lijing Cheng, John Abraham, Zeke Hausfather and Kevin Trenberth.” click here