Category Archives: global temperature

RSS satellite data set corrupted, no longer reliable

“…an interesting analysis by Professor Fritz Vahrenholt and Dr Sebastian Lüning (at diekaltesonne.de/schwerer-klimadopingverdacht-gegen-rss-satellitentemperaturen-nachtraglich-um-anderthalb-grad-angehoben) concludes that his dataset, having been thus tampered with, can no longer be considered reliable. The analysis sheds light on how the RSS dataset was massaged. The two scientists conclude that the ex-post-facto post-processing of the satellite data by RSS was insufficiently justified.” click here

Climate warmer in Roman and Midieval times

Jan Esper, David C. Frank, Mauri Timonen, Eduardo Zorita, Rob J. S. Wilson, Jürg Luterbacher, Steffen Holzkämper, Nils Fischer, Sebastian Wagner, Daniel Nievergelt, Anne Verstege, Ulf Büntgen. Orbital forcing of tree-ring data Nature Climate Change, volume 2, 862–866 (2012).

Solar insolation changes, resulting from long-term oscillations of orbital configurations1, are an important driver of Holocene climate2,3. The forcing is substantial over the past 2,000 years, up to four times as large as the 1.6 W m−2 net anthropogenic forcing since 1750 (ref. 4), but the trend varies considerably over time, space and with season5. Using numerous high-latitude proxy records, slow orbital changes have recently been shown6 to gradually force boreal summer temperature cooling over the common era. Here, we present new evidence based on maximum latewood density data from northern Scandinavia, indicating that this cooling trend was stronger (−0.31 °C per 1,000 years, ±0.03 °C) than previously reported, and demonstrate that this signature is missing in published tree-ring proxy records. The long-term trend now revealed in maximum latewood density data is in line with coupled general circulation models7,8 indicating albedo-driven feedback mechanisms and substantial summer cooling over the past two millennia in northern boreal and Arctic latitudes. These findings, together with the missing orbital signature in published dendrochronological records, suggest that large-scale near-surface air-temperature reconstructions9,10,11,12,13 relying on tree-ring data may underestimate pre-instrumental temperatures including warmth during Medieval and Roman times.

Hothouse earth paper is advocacy dressed up as science

“Yet, it is not a research paper and contains nothing new in the way of climate science. It is a future scenario pieced together by quoting selected (cherry-picked) references with a lot of hand-waving in-between. The author’s say it’s not conclusive, and they hope it’s not going to be true. They have a responsibility to ask the question, they claim, admitting it’s extreme.” click here

US surface temperatures decreasing…

“Over the last century, August 7th afternoon temperatures have plummeted in the US. In 1930, the average temperature was 93 degrees and almost 70% of the country was over 90 degrees. Compare vs August 7, 2017, which had an average temperature of 81 degrees and less than 20% of the US over 90 degrees.” click here

New York Times article distorts history; Its central claim is simply not true

“Even for the New York Times, this is a spectacular amount of lies packed into one article. The lead story on the front page of the New York Times on January 26, 1989 was “U.S. Data Since 1895 Fail To Show Warming Trend” “ click here

People are now seeing through the deception of this NY Times article (here) and the distorted claims about “climate change” and “global warming”. Click here

Urban heat island effect may shield cities from extreme cold

Jiachuan Yang and Elie Bou-Zeid. Should Cities Embrace Their Heat Islands as Shields from Extreme Cold? JAMC, https://doi.org/10.1175/JAMC-D-17-0265.1

The higher temperature in cities relative to their rural surroundings, known as the urban heat island (UHI), is one of the most well documented and severe anthropogenic modifications of the environment. Heat islands are hazardous to residents and the sustainability of cities during summertime and heat waves; on the other hand, they provide considerable benefits in wintertime. Yet, the evolution of UHIs during cold waves has not yet been explored. In this study, ground-based observations from 12 U.S. cities and high-resolution weather simulations show that UHIs not only warm urban areas in the winter but also further intensify during cold waves by up to 1.32° ± 0.78°C (mean ± standard deviation) at night relative to precedent and subsequent periods. Anthropogenic heat released from building heating is found to contribute more than 30% of the UHI intensification. UHIs thus serve as shelters against extreme-cold events and provide benefits that include mitigating cold hazard and reducing heating demand. More important, simulations indicate that standard UHI mitigation measures such as green or cool roofs reduce these cold-wave benefits to different extents. Cities, particularly in cool and cold temperate climates, should hence revisit their policies to favor (existing) mitigation approaches that are effective only during hot periods.

“Why are you a global warming denier?”

“I penned the following short-story, set in the year 2017, as a series of conversations between a twentysomething daughter and her mid-50s father. The father is a heretic of the church of catastrophic human-induced global warming/climate change. The daughter, Anna, is a believer. 
This work includes quotes from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and a well-respected politician. It also includes 22 illustrations, most of which are in color. And there are hyperlinks for those of you using Kindle readers where hyperlinks will work.”