Category Archives: Water Supply

Energy and water are not commodities to be taxed. They are necessities for a civil society.

“The idea of a tax on carbon is that it will cause people to use smaller amounts of oil, natural gas, and coal while driving innovation in the energy sector. But there’s a big problem with this kind of blindered thinking. Energy is not like any other commodity. It is the foundational component of all commodities and our options are extremely limited.” click here

Microplastics in Danjiangkou Reservoir, China

Di M, Liu X, Wang W, Wang J. Manuscript prepared for submission to environmental toxicology and pharmacology pollution in drinking water source areas: Microplastics in the Danjiangkou Reservoir, China. Environmental toxicology and pharmacology. 2018 Dec 17;65:82-89. doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2018.12.009.

As the source of water for the South-to-North Water Diversion Project of China, the water quality of the Danjiangkou Reservoir (DJKR) is related to the safety of drinking water for billions of residents. Consequently, microplastics in surface water and sediment samples of the DJKR were investigated in this study. Microplastics were observed in all water and sediment samples with abundances varying from 467 to 15,017 n/m3 and 15 to 40 n/kg wet weight, respectively. Microplastics were rich in colour and dominated by fibrous items. Small-sized particles (< 2 mm) were more frequently observed than other sizes. Analysis by micro-Raman spectroscopy showed that polypropylene was the major polymer type. These systematic results demonstrated that the DJKR is suffering from the pollution of microplastics, which should be paid more attention based on its potential threat to the aquatic organisms and residents impacted by the drinking water source pollution.

President Trump issues an Executive Order to improve conditions and reduce wild fire risk

Wildfires have burned more than 8.5 million acres this year. President Trump issued an executive order (here) allowing agencies to do more to prevent massive wildfires. The order came one day after Trump signed GOP-backed wildfire legislation.

Enough monies for clean drinking water and basic sewage treatment for every country in the world wasted on falsified climate science?

“Environmentalists are destroying environmentalism. As a subset of that destruction, creators of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) falsified science to claim that humans are causing global warming (AGW). That false science wasted trillions of dollars and disrupted millions of lives. That is enough money to provide clean drinking water and basic sewage for every country in the world.” click here

Assessment of water supply and sanitation in Chukotka and Yakutia, Russian Arctic

Dudarev AA. Public Health Practice Report: water supply and sanitation in Chukotka and Yakutia, Russian Arctic. International Journal Of Circumpolar Health 2018 Dec; Vol. 77 (1), pp. 1423826.

Information from 2013-2015 have been analysed on water accessibility, types of water service to households, use of water pretreatment, availability of sewerage, use of sewage treatment in Chukotka Autonomous Okrug and Yakutia Republic, based on evaluation information accessible in open sources, such as regional statistics and sanitary-epidemiologic reports. The main causes of the poor state of water supply and sanitation in the study regions include: very limited access to in-home running water (one-quarter of settlements in Chukotka and half of settlements in Yakutia have no regular water supply) and lack of centralised sewerage (78% and 94% of settlements correspondingly have no sewerage); lack of water pretreatment and sewage treatment, outdated technologies and systems; serious deterioration of facilities and networks, frequent accidents; secondary pollution of drinking water. Lack of open objective information on Russian Arctic water supply and sanitation in the materials of the regional and federal statistics hampers the assessment of the real state of affairs. The situation for water and sanitation supply in these Russian Arctic regions remains steadily unfavourable. A comprehensive intervention from national and regional governmental levels is urgently needed.

Assessment of the Municipal Water Cycle in China

Tao Wang, Shuming Liu, Xuepeng Qian, Toshiyuki Shimizu, Sébastien M.R. Dente, Seiji Hashimoto, Jun Nakajima. Assessment of the municipal water cycle in China. Science of The Total Environment Volumes 607–608, 31 December 2017, Pages 761-770.

Water produced from municipal utilities accounts for nearly 10% of the sum water demand in China. The municipal water cycle that integrates processes of urban water supply, water use, sewage treatment, and water reclamation has been assessed for 655 cities across nine drainage areas in mainland China in 2012. These cities in total extracted 55 km3 raw water for municipal use from surface waterbodies and ground aquifers, approximate to the countrywide freshwater extraction of Russia or Italy. After purification and transmission, 45 km3 water was distributed to industrial, service, and domestic users. 36 km3 of post-use sewage was collected and environmentally safely treated; merely 3.2 km3 of the treated water was reclaimed. Driven by increasing urbanization, the municipal water demand in cities of China may grow 70% by 2030. The Hai River and the Huai River basins, which harbor 137 cities and occupy a majority of the densely populated North China Plain, are most exposed to physical water scarcity. The municipal water abstraction in these cities can remain constant by promoting demand-side and process conservation in the next two decades. Interbasin transfer and unconventional sources will provide municipal water double than the cities’ need. Whereas the urban water security can be technically enhanced, the challenges are to better improve water use efficiency and mitigate economic and environmental costs of the municipal system.

Oroville Dam Spillway Repaired? or Not?

“The California Department of Water Resources acknowledged this week that many cracks have appeared in the new concrete of the Oroville Dam spillway, which cost over $500 million to repair.” click here