Impeachment claim to drive election climate change is based on unreliable computer models, way overpredicting demand

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“Democrat presidential hopeful and billionaire Tom Steyer claimed Tuesday night during the Democrat presidential debate at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, that “American people are demanding” the impeachment of President Donald Trump. ” click here

Willful blindness in the press on record cold temperatures

Climate history speaks much louder than modern-day computer models

“It is simple enough to test out which version of the pre-1980 temperature record is better. The version made by the people who lived through it, or the younger people now who are paid to generate graphs which show a lot of warming.  We can compare the two versions vs. historical accounts of ice and other observations.” click here

Cooling the past increases “global warming”

How to lie with (temperature) statistics

Coral reefs benefit from rising sea levels

Long-term observation of coral reefs indicate rising sea levels “not only promoted coral cover” but also “limit damaging effects of thermally-induced bleaching”

B. E. Brown, R. P. Dunne, P. J. Somerfield, A. J. Edwards, W. J. F. Simons,
N. Phongsuwan, L. Putchim, L. Anderson & M. C. Naeije. Long-term impacts of rising sea temperature and sea level on shallow water coral communities over a ~40 year period. Scientific Reports, volume 9, 2019

Effects of combined rising sea temperature and increasing sea level on coral reefs, both factors associated with global warming, have rarely been addressed. In this ~40 y study of shallow reefs in the eastern Indian Ocean, we show that a rising relative sea level, currently estimated at ~11 mm y−1, has not only promoted coral cover but also has potential to limit damaging effects of thermally-induced bleaching. In 2010 the region experienced the most severe bleaching on record with corals subject to sea temperatures of >31 °C for 7 weeks. While the reef flats studied have a common aspect and are dominated by a similar suite of coral species, there was considerable spatial variation in their bleaching response which corresponded with reef-flat depth. Greatest loss of coral cover and community structure disruption occurred on the shallowest reef flats. Damage was less severe on the deepest reef flat where corals were subject to less aerial exposure, rapid flushing and longer submergence in turbid waters. Recovery of the most damaged sites took only ~8 y. While future trajectories of these resilient reefs will depend on sea-level anomalies, and frequency of extreme bleaching the positive role of rising sea level should not be under-estimated.

The National Climate Assessment ‘hides the decline’