Transparency and independent verification necessary to restore confidence in climate science

“Half the results published in peer-reviewed scientific journals are probably wrong. John Ioannidis, now a professor of medicine at Stanford, made headlines with that claim in 2005. Since then, researchers have confirmed his skepticism by trying—and often failing—to reproduce many influential journal articles. Slowly, scientists are internalizing the lessons of this irreproducibility crisis. But what about government, which has been making policy for generations without confirming that the science behind it is valid?” click here

PM2.5 not likely associated with premature deaths

James E. Enstrom. Scientific Distortions in Fine Particulate Matter Epidemiology. Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons Volume 23 Number 1 Spring 2018

The theoretical prevention of premature deaths from the inhalation of fine particulate matter is being used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to justify the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and multibillion dollar regulations across the U.S., including the EPA Clean Power Plan and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Truck and Bus Regulation. The epidemiology is severely flawed. Fine particulates probably make no significant contribution to premature mortality in the U.S. The publication of null findings has been blocked or marginalized and studies claiming excess mortality need to be reassessed. click here

Colder temperatures are more hazardous than warmer

“A recent study published in an esteemed academic journal indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period. A joint research project of the Chronology Laboratory of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) suggests that the years 536 and 541-544 CE were very difficult for many people.” click here

Arctic Sea Ice the same thickness as 60 years ago

Source: Tony Heller

Short, weak solar cycle suggests global cooling ahead

“This is the first time we have seen a short and weak cycle since scientists began tracking the solar cycle in the 1700s, following the last grand minimum in the 1600s when there were almost no sunspots.” click here

Source: WUWT

A singular focus on trying to limit “global warming” ignores critical factors essential for community sustainability; Such a narrow focus is simply self-defeating.

“While Transactions is a leading scientific journal, these special issue articles are anything but scientific. There are no experiments or tests, or even carefully constructed real world observations. It is all just speculation and computer modeling. This is what alarmist so-called science looks like. It is all about the UN Paris Agreement, not science.” click here

Did polar bears eat a New York paper’s homework?

It’s easy to take one published paper and promote it as the entire story in any particular science discipline. It does not require any effort, no homework and no thoughtful consideration of differing perspectives.

But due diligence (acting with a certain standard of care), doing one’s homework and thoughtful consideration to valid points of view are important to any enterprise. It’s easy to get caught up in trying to win a spat with someone (I suspect we’ve all done it at least once in our lives) or blindly advocate a political position.

Mud slinging to attack and discredit a particular scientist (as reported here for example) and lawsuits filed by one scientist against another because of valid scientific disagreements gets all of us nowhere with regard to addressing real-world environmental problems. It is simply counterproductive.