Tag Archives: agricultural

No farmers, no food

“Thousands of farmers shut down highways in a go-slow protest converging on the Dutch capital Monday, as they protested being victimised by a government trying to meet European Union emissions laws by cracking down on agriculture.” click here

Red and processed meats not so bad after all…but the empire is striking back

“The evidence is too weak to justify telling individuals to eat less beef and pork, according to new research. The findings “erode public trust,” critics said.” click here

Farmers are not to blame for climate changes

“Dutch farmers blocked hundreds of miles of major roads with their tractors to protest what they say are attempts to scapegoat their industry and paint them as a “problem” that needs fixing in discussions over climate change.” click here

Failing to issue a press release because of scientific concerns does not qualify as “burying a report”

“A USDA spokesperson told The Hill in a statement that objections to promoting Ziska’s rice study were based on scientific disagreement, not political considerations.

“This was a joint decision by ARS national program leaders — all career scientists — not to send out a press release on this paper,” the spokesperson said, citing three concerns with the data used in the report. “ click here

Domestic livestock plays no significant role in climate changes

Albrecht Glatzle. Domestic Livestock and Its Alleged Role in Climate Change. http://dx.doi.org/10.5772/intechopen.80389

It is very old wisdom that climate dictates farm management strategies. In recent years, however, we are increasingly confronted with claims that agriculture, livestock husbandry, and even food consumption habits are forcing the climate to change. We subjected this worrisome concern expressed by public institutions, the media, policy makers, and even scientists to a rigorous review, cross-checking critical coherence and(in)compatibilities within and between published scientific papers. Our key conclusionis there is no need for anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), and even less so for livestock-born emissions, to explain climate change. Climate has always been changing, and even the present warming is most likely driven by natural factors. The warming potential of anthropogenic GHG emissions has been exaggerated, and the beneficial impacts of manmade CO2 emissions for nature, agriculture, and global food secu- rity have been systematically suppressed, ignored, or at least downplayed by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and other UN (United Nations) agencies.Furthermore, we expose important methodological deficiencies in IPCC and FAO (Food Agriculture Organization) instructions and applications for the quantification of the manmade part of non-CO2-GHG emissions from agro-ecosystems. However, so far, thesefatal errors inexorably propagated through scientific literature. Finally, we could not find a clear domestic livestock fingerprint, neither in the geographical methane distributionnor in the historical evolution of mean atmospheric methane concentration. In conclu-sion, everybody is free to choose a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle, but there is no scientificbasis, whatsoever, for claiming this decision could contribute to save the planet’s climate.

Climate change will help U.S. corn production

“Contrary to previous analyses, research published by Michigan State University shows that projected changes in temperature and humidity will not lead to greater water use in corn. This means that while changes in temperatures and humidity trend as they have in the past 50 years, crop yields can not only survive – but thrive.” click here

Central US Climate Changes Attributed to Agriculture

Ross E. Alter, Hunter C. Douglas, Jonathan M. Winter, Elfatih A. B. Eltahir. 20th-century regional climate change in the central United States attributed to agricultural intensification. Geophysical Research Letters. DOI: 10.1002/2017GL075604

Both land-use changes and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have significantly modified regional climate over the last century. In the central United States, for example, observational data indicate that rainfall increased, surface air temperature decreased, and surface humidity increased during the summer over the course of the 20th century concurrently with increases in both agricultural production and global GHG emissions. However, the relative contributions of each of these forcings to the observed regional changes remain unclear. Results of both regional climate model simulations and observational analyses suggest that much of the observed rainfall increase – as well as the decrease in temperature and increase in humidity – is attributable to agricultural intensification in the central United States, with natural variability and GHG emissions playing secondary roles. Thus, we conclude that 20th-century land-use changes contributed more to forcing observed regional climate change during the summer in the central United States than increasing GHG emissions.