Tag Archives: arctic

Arctic sea ice volume increasing

“Ten years ago, America’s leading Arctic experts said the climate had passed the tipping point, and the Arctic could be ice-free between 2013 and 2018. The exact opposite has happened. Arctic sea ice volume is up 30% over the past ten years.” click here

Predictions of Arctic sea ice demise are not science-based

“There has been no trend in Arctic sea ice extent over the last twelve years. But climate scientists aren’t interested in facts.” click here

Arctic ice increase….hockey stick?

“No one knows how long this divergence of surplus ice will persist, but for now 2018 Arctic ice extent resembles a hockey stick.  Presently the ice is 525.000 km^2 above 11 year average (2007 to 2017 inclusive) and  ~1M km^2 greater than 2007.” click here

Debunking fake climate claims regarding arctic sea ice

“James Hansen was dead wrong about all of his forecasts over the past 30 years, so fake climate scientists and the fake news press have quite predictably ramped up their lies and claim the exact opposite.” click here

No direct effects of ocean acidification observed in Arctic specie

Peter Thor, Fanny Vermandele, Marie-Helene Carignan, Sarah Jacque, Piero Calosi.  No maternal or direct effects of ocean acidification on egg hatching in the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis PLOS ONE 13(2): e0192496. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192496

Widespread ocean acidification (OA) is transforming the chemistry of the global ocean and the Arctic is recognised as the region where this transformation will occur at the fastest rate. Moreover, many Arctic species are considered less capable of tolerating OA due to their lower capacity for acid-base regulation. This inability may put severe restraints on many fundamental functions, such as growth and reproductive investments, which ultimately may result in reduced fitness. However, maternal effects may alleviate severe effects on the offspring rendering them more tolerant to OA. In a highly replicated experiment we studied maternal and direct effects of OA predicted for the Arctic shelf seas on egg hatching time and success in the keystone copepod species Calanus glacialis. We incubated females at present day conditions (pHT 8.0) and year 2100 extreme conditions (pHT 7.5) during oogenesis and subsequently reciprocally transplanted laid eggs between these two conditions. Statistical tests showed no effects of maternal or direct exposure to OA at this level. We hypothesise that Cglacialis may be physiologically adapted to egg production at low pH since oogenesis can also take place at conditions of potentially low haemolymph pH of the mother during hibernation in the deep.

Arctic Sea Ice the same thickness as 60 years ago

Source: Tony Heller

Assessment of water supply and sanitation in Chukotka and Yakutia, Russian Arctic

Dudarev AA. Public Health Practice Report: water supply and sanitation in Chukotka and Yakutia, Russian Arctic. International Journal Of Circumpolar Health 2018 Dec; Vol. 77 (1), pp. 1423826.

Information from 2013-2015 have been analysed on water accessibility, types of water service to households, use of water pretreatment, availability of sewerage, use of sewage treatment in Chukotka Autonomous Okrug and Yakutia Republic, based on evaluation information accessible in open sources, such as regional statistics and sanitary-epidemiologic reports. The main causes of the poor state of water supply and sanitation in the study regions include: very limited access to in-home running water (one-quarter of settlements in Chukotka and half of settlements in Yakutia have no regular water supply) and lack of centralised sewerage (78% and 94% of settlements correspondingly have no sewerage); lack of water pretreatment and sewage treatment, outdated technologies and systems; serious deterioration of facilities and networks, frequent accidents; secondary pollution of drinking water. Lack of open objective information on Russian Arctic water supply and sanitation in the materials of the regional and federal statistics hampers the assessment of the real state of affairs. The situation for water and sanitation supply in these Russian Arctic regions remains steadily unfavourable. A comprehensive intervention from national and regional governmental levels is urgently needed.