Tag Archives: Canada

Fluoride exposure for pregnant women, Canada

Till C, Green R, Grundy JG, Hornung R, Neufeld R, Martinez-Mier EA, Ayotte P, Muckle G, Lanphear B. Community Water Fluoridation and Urinary Fluoride Concentrations in a National Sample of Pregnant Women in Canada. Environmental health perspectives. 2018 Oct;126(10):107001. doi: 10.1289/EHP3546.

BACKGROUND: Fluoride exposures have not been established for pregnant women who live in regions with and without community water fluoridation.

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to measure urinary fluoride levels during pregnancy. We also assessed the contribution of drinking-water and tea consumption habits to maternal urinary fluoride (MUF) concentrations and evaluated the impact of various dilution correction standards, including adjustment for urinary creatinine and specific gravity (SG).

METHODS: We measured MUF concentrations in spot samples collected in each trimester of pregnancy from 1,566 pregnant women in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals cohort. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to assess variability in MUF concentrations across pregnancy. We used regression analyses to estimate associations between MUF levels, tea consumption, and water fluoride concentrations as measured by water treatment plants.

RESULTS: Creatinine-adjusted MUF values  were almost two times higher for pregnant women living in fluoridated regions  compared with nonfluoridated regions. MUF values tended to increase over the course of pregnancy using both unadjusted values and adjusted values. Reproducibility of the unadjusted and adjusted MUF values was modest . The municipal water fluoride level was positively associated with creatinine-adjusted MUF, accounting for 24% of the variance after controlling for covariates. Higher MUF concentrations correlated with numbers of cups of black but not green tea. Urinary creatinine and SG correction methods were highly correlated and were interchangeable in models examining predictors of MUF.

CONCLUSION: Community water fluoridation is a major source of fluoride exposure for pregnant women living in Canada. Urinary dilution correction with creatinine and SG were shown to be interchangeable for our sample of pregnant women.

Wind Farm construction initiates major Canadian forest fire

“Despite “extreme fire hazard” conditions and a region-wide fire ban, a number of workers say crews continued to blast rock and use heavy machinery that had set off several small fires earlier last week. The workers asked CBC News to withhold their names out of fear of losing their jobs.” click here

THMs and HAAs in Small Water Systems, Canada

Chowdhury S. Occurrences and changes of disinfection by-products in small water supply systems. Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 20;190(1):32. doi: 10.1007/s10661-017-6410-8.

The small water supply systems (WSSs) often report high concentrations of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. In this study, occurrences of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Canada, were investigated from 441 WSSs for a period of 18 years (1999-2016). The WSSs were divided into groundwater (GWP) and surface water (SWP) systems, which were further classified into eight sub-groups (P1-P8) based on the population served (≤ 100; 101-250; 251-500; 501-1000; 1001-3000; 3001-5000; 5001-10,000; and 10,000+, respectively). The DBPs with probable and possible carcinogenic forms were estimated. Overall, 31.1% of WSSs were GWP, in which averages of THMs and HAAs were 32.2 and 27.7 μg/L, respectively, while the SWP had averages of THMs and HAAs of 97.6 and 129.2 μg/L, respectively. The very small WSSs (P1-P3) of GWP had averages of THMs and HAAs in the ranges of 29.1-43.5 and 15.8-64.3 μg/L, respectively. The P1-P3 of SWP had averages of THMs and HAAs in the ranges of 92.6-112.8 and 108.0-154.0 μg/L, respectively, which often exceeded the Canadian guideline limits. If the samples represented the populations homogenously, the total populations exposed to THMs or HAA5 above the guideline values would be in the range of 132.08-181.38 in thousands (30.3-41.6% of total populations). The probable and possible carcinogenic forms of THMs in GWP and SWP were in the ranges of 4.8-48.8 and 4.4-7.0% of THMs, respectively. In HAAs, carcinogenic forms were in the ranges of 82.6-98.4 and 97.6-98.7%, respectively. The findings indicated that the SWP might need further attention to better protect human health.

Iodo-Trihalomethanes in Canadian Drinking Water

Tugulea AM, Aranda-Rodriguez R, Bérubé D, Giddings M, Lemieux F, Hnatiw J, Dabeka L, Breton F. The influence of precursors and treatment process on the formation of Iodo-THMs in Canadian drinking water. Water Res. 2017 Nov 27;130:215-223. doi: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.11.055.

The National Survey of Disinfection By-Products and Selected Emerging Contaminants investigated the formation of various disinfection by-products and contaminants in 65 water treatment systems (WTSs) across Canada. Results for six iodo-trihalomethanes (iodo-THMs) are reported in this paper. The participating water treatment systems included large, medium and small systems using water sources and treatment processes which were representative of Canadian drinking water. Five water samples (source water, treated water and three water samples along the distribution system) were collected from each treatment system, both under winter and summer conditions. Samples were stabilized, shipped cold and analysed for six iodo-THMs (dichloroiodomethane-DCIM; dibromoiodomethane-DBIM; bromochloroiodomethane-BCIM; chlorodiiodomethane-CDIM; bromodiiodomethane-BDIM and triiodomethane or iodoform-TIM), using a SPME-GC-ECD method developed in our laboratory (MDLs from 0.02 μg/L for iodoform to 0.06 μg/L for bromodiiodomethane). Concentrations of relevant precursors like dissolved organic carbon (DOC), bromide, iodide and total iodine, as well as other water quality parameters, were also determined. Detailed information about the treatment process used at each location was recorded using a questionnaire. The survey showed that one or more iodo-THMs were detected at 31 out of 64 water treatment systems (WTSs) under winter conditions and in 46 out of 64 WTSs under summer conditions (analytical results from one site were excluded due to sampling challenges). Total iodo-THM concentrations measured during this survey ranged from 0.02 μg/L to 21.66 μg/L. The highest total iodo-THM concentration was measured in WTS 63 where all six iodo-THMs were detected and iodoform was present in the highest concentration. The highest iodo-THM formation was found to occur in treatment systems where water sources had naturally occurring ammonium as well as high bromide, high iodide and/or total iodine concentrations. In two such water systems the total concentration of iodo-THMs exceeded the concentration of regulated THMs.

Polar Bears are Doing Just Fine, Thank You.

“The overwhelming conclusion from years of accumulated conversations with native populations about polar bears is that there is almost no connection between the long-term observations of polar bear ecology and the more recent claims that polar bears as a species are in grave danger due to climate change and thinning sea ice.

In fact, the long-term observations suggest that polar bear subpopulations are currently faring quite well, with 92% of  the subpopulations studied either remaining stable or growing in recent years.” click here

Canadian Wind Energy is Unsustainable

“TransAlta Corp. said Tuesday the blades on 57 turbines at its Cowley Ridge facility near Pincher Creek have already been halted and the towers are to be toppled and recycled for scrap metal this spring. The company inherited the now-obsolete facility, built between 1993 and 1994, as part of its $1.6-billion hostile takeover of Calgary-based Canadian Hydro Developers Inc. in 2009.” click here

Does Global Warming Increase Hudson Bay Sea Ice, or Does it Decrease Hudson Bay Sea Ice?

Does global warming increase or decrease Hudson Bay Sea ice? I’m just wondering….. click here