Tag Archives: climate

Water vapor is earth’s thermostat

Ivan R. Kennedy, Migdat Hodzic. Testing the hypothesis that variations in atmospheric water vapour are the main cause of fluctuations in global temperature, Periodicals of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Vol. 7, No. 2, August 2019, pp.870-880.

A hypothesis that the increasing application of both surface and ground water for irrigation of crops is a significant source of anthropogenic global warming is tested. In climate models, water is already assigned a major secondary amplifying role in warming, solely as a positive feedback from an atmosphere previously warmed by other GHGs. However, this conclusion ignores the direct anthropogenic forcing from increasing use of water in dry regions to grow crops for the human population. The area irrigated worldwide increased by around 1.5% annually between 1960 and 2000, almost trebling in magnitude. Importantly, though only a small proportion of the Earth’s surface, this additional water vapour is dynamically focussed on dry land, intensifying its potential to elevate the troposphere and reduce the regional OLR. Our modelling analysis suggests that the increase in atmospheric water vapour from irrigation could be significantly more than 1% by 2050 compared to 1950, imposing a global forcing
than 1% by 2050. Fortunately, this hypothesis can be tested, for example, using the satellite data on OLR acquired since the 1970s, relating this to local trends of increasing irrigation or major floods in arid regions. If found consistent with the data, current proposals to mitigate climate change by limiting combustion of fossil fuels may prove less effective. This prediction regarding the warming effect of increasing irrigation is tested using NCAR reanalysis data made possible by the natural experiments of the periodic flooding of Lake Eyre in Australia’s semi-arid interior. It is recommended that this hypothesis be tested using data from local studies in irrigated regions such as changes in outgoing longwave radiation and in increased absorption of incoming shortwave radiation in air.

Carbon dioxide has negligible effect on climate

“Within the last few years, over 50 papers have been added to our compilation of scientific studies that find the climate’s sensitivity to doubled CO2 (280 ppm to 560 ppm) ranges from <0 to 1°C. When no quantification is provided, words like “negligible” are used to describe CO2’s effect on the climate. The list has now reached 106 scientific papers." click here

UN Secretary General misleading the world on climate

“It’s certainly no misperception that global warming alarmists have become far more shrill over the past months with ever wilder, more sensational claims about how the climate is getting more dangerous.” click here

Here’s common sense on climate…

“We don’t know how the climate of the 21st century will evolve, and we will undoubtedly be surprised. Given this uncertainty, precise emissions targets and deadlines are scientifically meaningless. We can avoid much of the political gridlock by implementing common sense, no-regrets strategies that improve energy technologies, lift people out of poverty and make them more resilient to extreme weather events.” click here

Climate change migration myths

“Although the potential for climate change to disrupt livelihoods and threaten lives is real, these policies reinforce a false narrative that predicts large numbers of ‘climate refugees’. This self-referencing narrative in scientific literature and policy reports has the consequence of entrenching climate migration as a looming security crisis without an empirical scientific basis.” click here

fake news about ice, snow and cold temperatures

Climate history speaks much louder than modern-day computer models

“It is simple enough to test out which version of the pre-1980 temperature record is better. The version made by the people who lived through it, or the younger people now who are paid to generate graphs which show a lot of warming.  We can compare the two versions vs. historical accounts of ice and other observations.” click here