Tag Archives: climate policy

Climate change mitigation programs do not help the poor

“The claim that aggressive climate change mitigation programs helps the poor is egregiously misleading. Modern coal plants are a success story, as pollutants emitted have fallen dramatically with technological improvements over the past several decades.”click here

Climate models are unreliable for making policy and writing regulations

“Yesterday we posted on how rainfall across southern Europe has risen over the past couple of decades, thus going in the opposite direction of what was projected by climate models. And once again the models are shown to be woefully faulty and an unreliable tool for policymaking, as the following example shows.” click here

Separate climate politics from climate science

Disputes between climate scientists (such as here) are usually drive by politics and presumptions, not science. To make any progress at all we must not confuse the two. separating the science from the politics. Here is where groups like the IPCC have throughly failed.

“All scientists should be skeptics.”

“Science is all about proving, not believing. In that regard, I am a skeptic not just about global warming but also about many other aspects of science.

All scientists should be skeptics. Climate is too complicated to attribute its variability to one cause. We first need to understand the natural climate variability (which we clearly don’t; I can debate anybody on this issue). Only then we can assess the magnitude and reasons of climate change. Science would have never advanced if it were not for the skeptics.” click here

The French lead the way to end the global warming crusade?

“The French love a good riot, but the political backlash to the French government’s plans to increase carbon taxes on fuel could be a harbinger of what’s to come in countries committed to the global warming crusade.” click here

What does it mean to be good stewards of the climate?

“Historically there have been three broad ways of viewing the natural world. Primitive cultures viewed it as a personal entity with a mind of its own. Biblical cultures view it as the work of a Supreme creator. Modern secularists view it as a random, uncreated entity. Each view implies very different attitudes towards the environment. I argue that the functional worldview leads most easily to a coherent ethic of environmental protection, but also subordinates it to the interests of humans. It implies that nature has intrinsic, but not infinite, value. The secular view does not privilege human action, but neither does it establish a rationale for viewing nature as intrinsically valuable. I conclude by setting out some general conclusions about how these ideas might affect the way we approach climate policy, with specific reference to the Biblical doctrine of stewardship and the parable of the talents.” click here

Paris climate deal makes “grand promises” that will not have a lasting benefit

” “Here’s a United Nations climate report that environmentalists probably don’t want anybody to read. It says that even if every country abides by the grand promises they made last year in Paris to reduce greenhouse gases, the planet would still be “doomed.” ” click here