Tag Archives: extreme weather

Save the people of the planet from the people who think they will save the planet

“Rossiter to Congress: “Extreme weather events such as cyclones, floods, droughts and tornadoes are not increasing in incidence or lives lost. Indeed, the global mortality from all weather-related natural disasters declined by 99 percent while the population trebled after 1920, thanks to improved economies and technologies. Food production and calorie consumption per capita continue to increase, thanks to the green revolution, increased CO2 fertilization and longer growing seasons. Fossil fuels contribute enormously to the production, safe storage and transport of food and thus to human nutrition.”click here (from WUWT)

Weather forecasting has a predictability limit

“Unpredictability in how weather develops means that even with perfect models and understanding of initial conditions, there is a limit to how far in advance accurate forecasts are possible, scientists said.” click here

The Chicago Tribune fails to do its homework

“The Chicago Tribune says that Rock River flooding is caused by “climate change” – and is “only going to get worse.” ” click here

Strong hurricanes not related to atmospheric CO2

“Will the intensity of hurricanes increase with climate change? Can this be detected today, as Levermann concludes so trivially? This is not the case, say researchers around Lory Trenary from George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. They investigated climate models and re-analyses and found no connection with the drive by greenhouse gases, especially CO2.” click here

Extreme weather intensification not linked to rising CO2 emissions

“As a continuation of the IPCC’s observation (2013) that there has been no detectable trend in storm and cyclone intensification (or extreme weather in general) that can be clearly linked to rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, a new paper documents the rapid decline in eddy kinetic (EKE) and mean available potential energy (MAPE) since the late 1970s. This undermines the popularized claims that human activity worsens extreme weather events.” click here

Extreme cold not related to “Climate change”

“Numerous media outlets cited last week’s polar vortex as an example of extreme weather caused by climate change, but it turns out such cold snaps are actually on the decline.” click here

“Climate change” is so slow it is hardly noticeable

If climate is defined as average weather over a 30 year period (i.e. WMO definition), then it would take several decades to see any true change show up given the wide variability experienced year to year. To illustrate, consider this plot of 100 years of maximum surface temperature data at Fire Station #3, Riverside, California.

Figure 8 top

Did the climate change? Well, yes it changes every day, month, year and decade, in this case with temperature swings within a wide band of variability.

But was there a permanent change based on 30-year averages? Perhaps so, but would it be noticed? It’s refreshing to see scientists (such as here) now starting to point out the long-term nature of changing climates.

The Clinton Administration White House held a summit on climate change in the early 90’s looking at a wide range of issues. With regard to water supplies, Denver Water Department Executive Director Hamlet J. Barry III (better known as ‘Chips Barry’) attended this meeting and argued quit correctly that a true change in climate happens over many decades which is slow enough for water utilities to adjust to any changes. I suspect the same would be the case for cities and towns as well. In reality action is already being taken to respond to slow changes in climate.

A greater need is to develop resilience to extreme weather events, which can happen at any time, and are unrelated to “climate change”.