Tag Archives: extreme weather

Cold periods due to natural cycles, not global warming

“Yet, as the cold approaches, global warming activists are now feverishly scrambling to blame it on “global warming” in a desperate bid to dampen the embarrassment of their earlier predictions of balmy, snowless winters. They insist that the cold shots are due to global warming disrupting weather patterns.” click here

Increased Carbon Dioxide Makes Climate Less Extreme

“Over the past century, as CO2 has increased in the atmosphere, the frequency of hot days in the US has plummeted.” click here

California fires not related to “climate change”

“But the scientific facts and historical record reveal such “wrath of God” claims to be baseless. The notion that alleged man-made climate change is causing California’s fires is not supported by recent peer-reviewed scientific studies or historical data. Even the LA Times has previously rebuked Gov. Jerry Brown for making such scientifically baseless claims about wildfires. But the hard scientific data revealing no connection to ‘global warming’ will not prevent the media and climate activists from their usual claims trying to link wildfires to ‘climate change.’” “ click here

New studies point to less intense, less frequent storms due to global warming

“The studies fly in the face of a recent Nature editorial piece, one filled with the usual worn out alarmist propaganda language of climate doom we’ve been seeing for over a quarter century. The editorial claims some scientists have already found the link between “weird weather” and greenhouse gases.” click here

Surface Warming Resulted in Less Cyclone Activity, East Asia

Haishan Chen, Fangda Teng, Wanxin Zhang, Hong Liao. Impacts of Anomalous Midlatitude Cyclone Activity over East Asia during Summer on the Decadal Mode of East Asian Summer Monsoon and Its Possible Mechanism. Journal of Climate, 739-753. 15 January 2017.

By using an objective identification and tracking algorithm of the cyclone, the statistics of midlatitude cyclone activity in East Asia during summer for the period 1979–2013 were analyzed. The impact of the midlatitude summer cyclone anomalies in East Asia on the decadal mode of East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) was investigated and possible mechanisms were proposed. The possible reasons for the anomalous cyclone activity from the perspective of land surface thermal forcing were also explored. Results indicate that the midlatitude summer cyclone activity over East Asia exhibits decadal changes in the period of 1979–2013 and is significantly weakened after early 1990s. Further analysis indicates that there is a close relationship between the midlatitude summer cyclone activity over East Asia and the decadal variation of EASM; when the midlatitude summer cyclone activity over East Asia is strong (weak), EASM tends to be intensified (weakened), and the weak cyclone activity after 1993 generally coincides with the decadal weakening of EASM. Moreover, there is a close linkage between the weakening of cyclonic activity after the early 1990s and the nonuniform surface warming of the Eurasian continent. Significant warming to the west of Mongolia tends to weaken the north–south temperature gradient and the atmospheric baroclinicity to its south and eventually can lead to weakening of the midlatitude cyclone activity over East Asia.

 

Warming Results in Decreasing Trend in Severe Weather Occurrence, China

Qinghong Zhang, Xiang Ni, Fuqing Zhang. Decreasing trend in severe weather occurrence over China during the past 50 years. Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 42310 (2017)
doi:10.1038/srep42310

Understanding the trend of localized severe weather under the changing climate is of great significance but remains challenging which is at least partially due to the lack of persistent and homogeneous severe weather observations at climate scales while the detailed physical processes of severe weather cannot be resolved in global climate models. Based on continuous and coherent severe weather reports from over 500 manned stations, for the first time, this study shows a significant decreasing trend in severe weather occurrence across China during the past five decades. The total number of severe weather days that have either thunderstorm, hail and/or damaging wind decrease about 50% from 1961 to 2010. It is further shown that the reduction in severe weather occurrences correlates strongly with the weakening of East Asian summer monsoon which is the primary source of moisture and dynamic forcing conducive for warm-season severe weather over China.

No Significant Trend in Major Floods in North America, Europe

Glenn A. Hodgkins, Paul H. Whitfield, Donald H. Burn, Jamie Hannaford, Benjamin Renard, Kerstin, Stahl, Anne K. Fleig, Henrik Madsen, Luis Mediero, Johanna, Korhonen, Conor Murphy, Donna Wilson. Climate-driven variability in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe  Journal of Hydrology Volume 552, September 2017, Pages 704-717  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.07.027

Concern over the potential impact of anthropogenic climate change on flooding has led to a proliferation of studies examining past flood trends. Many studies have analysed annual-maximum flow trends but few have quantified changes in major (25–100 year return period) floods, i.e. those that have the greatest societal impacts. Existing major-flood studies used a limited number of very large catchments affected to varying degrees by alterations such as reservoirs and urbanisation. In the current study, trends in major-flood occurrence from 1961 to 2010 and from 1931 to 2010 were assessed using a very large dataset (>1200 gauges) of diverse catchments from North America and Europe; only minimally altered catchments were used, to focus on climate-driven changes rather than changes due to catchment alterations. Trend testing of major floods was based on counting the number of exceedances of a given flood threshold within a group of gauges. Evidence for significant trends varied between groups of gauges that were defined by catchment size, location, climate, flood threshold and period of record, indicating that generalizations about flood trends across large domains or a diversity of catchment types are ungrounded. Overall, the number of significant trends in major-flood occurrence across North America and Europe was approximately the number expected due to chance alone. Changes over time in the occurrence of major floods were dominated by multidecadal variability rather than by long-term trends. There were more than three times as many significant relationships between major-flood occurrence and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation than significant long-term trends.