Tag Archives: radon

Radon in Groundwater, 12 Cities, China

Wu Y, Cui H, Liu J, Shang B, Su X. Radon Concentrations in Underground Drinking Water in Parts of Cities, China. Radiation protection dosimetry. 2017 Aug 31:1-5. doi: 10.1093/rpd/ncx121.

222Rn concentrations in underground drinking water samples in 12 cities from seven provinces (municipalities), China were determined by using a continuous radon monitor with air-water exchanger. A total of 73 underground water samples were collected. The observed radon levels were in a range of 1.0-63.8 Bq l-1, with a mean of 11.8 Bq l-1. The annual effective dose from inhalation of water-borne radon for average radon content in underground water was 72.6 μSv and for maximal observed radon concentration in underground water the corresponding dose was 393.8 μSv. The dose contribution of inhalation dose from water-borne radon should be paid attention in some granitic area.

Radon in Water Samples Within Health Guidelines, Jammu District, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Kumar A, Kaur M, Mehra R, Sharma DK, Mishra R. Comparative Study of Radon Concentration With Two Techniques and Elemental Analysis in Drinking Water Samples of the Jammu District, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Health physics. 2017 Aug 7. doi: 10.1097/HP.0000000000000644.

The level of radon concentration has been assessed using the Advanced SMART RnDuo technique in 30 drinking water samples from Jammu district, Jammu and Kashmir, India. The water samples were collected from wells, hand pumps, submersible pumps, and stored waters. The randomly obtained 14 values of radon concentration in water sources using the SMART RnDuo technique have been compared and cross checked by a RAD7 device. A good positive correlation (R = 0.88) has been observed between the two techniques. The overall value of radon concentration in various water sources has ranged from 2.45 to 18.43 Bq L, with a mean value of 8.24 ± 4.04 Bq L, and it agreed well with the recommended limit suggested by the European Commission and UNSCEAR. However, the higher activity of mean radon concentration was found in groundwater drawn from well, hand and submersible pumps as compared to stored water. The total annual effective dose due to radon inhalation and ingestion ranged from 6.69 to 50.31 μSv y with a mean value of 22.48 ± 11.03 μSv y. The total annual effective dose was found to lie within the safe limit (100 μSv y) suggested by WHO. Heavy metal analysis was also carried out in various water sources by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), and the highest value of heavy metals was found mostly in groundwater samples. The obtained results were compared with Indian and International organizations like WHO and the EU Council. Among all the samples, the elemental analysis is not on the exceeding side of the permissible limit.

Radon and Heavy Metals in Drinking Water, Jammu & Kashmir, India

Kaur M, Sharma S, Mehra R, Sharma DK, Mishra R. RADIATION DOSE DUE TO RADON AND HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN DRINKING WATER SAMPLES OF JAMMU DISTRICT, JAMMU & KASHMIR, INDIA. Kumar A, Radiation protection dosimetry. 2016 Oct;171(2):217-222.

In the present investigation, radon concentration and heavy metal analysis were carried out in drinking water samples in Jammu district, Jammu & Kashmir, India. The radon concentration was measured by using RAD-7, portable alpha particle detector. The values of radon concentration in drinking water samples were also compared within the safe limit recommended by different health agencies. The total annual effective dose ranged from 53.04 to 197.29 µSv y-1 The annual effective dose from few locations from the studied area was found to be greater than the safe limit (100 µSv y-1) suggested by World Health Organisation (WHO) and EU Council. Heavy metal concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A total of eight elements were analysed, viz. arsenic, mercury, zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and cadmium. Heavy metals are considered to be the major pollutants of water sources. The results were compared with the limits of WHO, EU and Indian organisations. The trace metal analysis is not on the exceeding side of the permissible limit in all the samples.

Radon Radiation Dose in Jammu District, Jammu and Kashmir, India

Kumar A, Kaur M, Sharma S, Mehra R, Sharma DK, Mishra R. RADIATION DOSE DUE TO RADON AND HEAVY METAL ANALYSIS IN DRINKING WATER SAMPLES OF JAMMU DISTRICT, JAMMU & KASHMIR, INDIARadiat Prot Dosimetry. 2016 Mar 30. pii: ncw062. 

In the present investigation, radon concentration and heavy metal analysis were carried out in drinking water samples in Jammu district, Jammu & Kashmir, India. The radon concentration was measured by using RAD-7, portable alpha particle detector. The values of radon concentration in drinking water samples were also compared within the safe limit recommended by different health agencies. The total annual effective dose ranged from 53.04 to 197.29 µSv y-1 The annual effective dose from few locations from the studied area was found to be greater than the safe limit (100 µSv y-1) suggested by World Health Organisation (WHO) and EU Council. Heavy metal concentration was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. A total of eight elements were analysed, viz. arsenic, mercury, zinc, iron, copper, chromium, manganese and cadmium. Heavy metals are considered to be the major pollutants of water sources. The results were compared with the limits of WHO, EU and Indian organisations. The trace metal analysis is not on the exceeding side of the permissible limit in all the samples.

Radon in Drinking Water, West Bank – Palestine

Thabayneh KM. Measurement of 222Rn concentration levels in drinking water and the associated health effects in the Southern part of West bank – Palestine. Applied radiation and isotopes. 2015 May 14;103:48-53. doi: 10.1016/j.apradiso.2015.05.007.

Radon concentration and annual effective doses were measured in drinking water in the Southern Part of West Bank – Palestine, by using both passive and active techniques. 184 samples were collected from various sources i.e. tap water, groundwater, rain waters and mineral waters. It is found that the annual effective dose resulting from inhalation and ingestion of radon emanated from all types of drinking water is negligible compared to the total annual effective dose from indoor radon in the region. Results reveal that there is no significant public health risk from radon ingested and inhalation with drinking water in the study region.

Perchlorate in the Great Lakes Predominantly Natural in Origin

Poghosyan A, Sturchio NC, Morrison CG, Beloso AD Jr, Guan Y, Eiler JM, Jackson WA, Hatzinger PB. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin. Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Oct 7;48(19):11146-53. doi: 10.1021/es502796d. Epub 2014 Sep 12.

Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean.

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