Tag Archives: solar energy

California new home solar panel mandate a “feel good” action with no impact on climate changes

“California will mandate solar panels on new homes out of concern for climate change, a policy that will raise prices in the most expensive home market in the country and does little to decrease the state’s carbon footprint.” click here

100 percent renewable energy is unsustainable

Matthew R. Shaner, Steven J. Davis, Nathan S. Lewis, Ken Caldeira. Geophysical constraints on the reliability of solar and wind power in the United States. Energy Environ. Sci., 2018, doi: 10.1039/C7EE03029K

We analyze 36 years of global, hourly weather data (1980–2015) to quantify the covariability of solar and wind resources as a function of time and location, over multi-decadal time scales and up to continental length scales. Assuming minimal excess generation, lossless transmission, and no other generation sources, the analysis indicates that wind-heavy or solar-heavy U.S.-scale power generation portfolios could in principle provide ∼80% of recent total annual U.S. electricity demand. However, to reliably meet 100% of total annual electricity demand, seasonal cycles and unpredictable weather events require several weeks’ worth of energy storage and/or the installation of much more capacity of solar and wind power than is routinely necessary to meet peak demand. To obtain ∼80% reliability, solar-heavy wind/solar generation mixes require sufficient energy storage to overcome the daily solar cycle, whereas wind-heavy wind/solar generation mixes require continental-scale transmission to exploit the geographic diversity of wind. Policy and planning aimed at providing a reliable electricity supply must therefore rigorously consider constraints associated with the geophysical variability of the solar and wind resource—even over continental scales.

Expect Renewables to Increase Energy Prices (in some cases to unaffordable levels).

“The one thing we know for sure is that even though sunlight and moving air is free, there is no country on Earth with lots of solar and wind power and cheap electricity.” click here

Solar Power Snow Job, United Kingdom

“The renewable lobby would like you to believe that solar power is an important part of our future energy strategy. But they don’t tell you just how little power is produced during winter months, at the time when demand is at its peak.” click here

Solar Powered NF/RO Systems, Tanzania

Owusu-Agyeman I, Shen J, Schäfer AI. Renewable energy powered membrane technology: Impact of pH and ionic strength on fluoride and natural organic matter removal. The Science of the total environment. 2017 Nov 23;621:138-147. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.111.

Real water pH and ionic strength vary greatly, which influences the performance of membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Systematic variation of pH (3-12) and ionic strength (2-10g/L as total dissolved solids (TDS)) was undertaken with a real Tanzanian water to investigate how water quality affects retention mechanisms of fluoride (F) and natural organic matter (NOM). An autonomous solar powered NF/RO system driven by a solar array simulator was supplied with constant power from a generator. An open NF (NF270) and a brackish water RO (BW30) membrane were used. A surface water with a very high F (59.7mg/L) and NOM (110mgC/L) was used. Retention of F by NF270 was <20% at pH<6, increased to 40% at pH6, and 60-70% at pH7-12, indicating a dominance of charge repulsion while being ineffective in meeting the guideline of 1.5mg/L. Increase in ionic strength led to a significant decline in retention of F (from 70 to 50%) and electrical conductivity (from 60 to 10%) by NF270, presumably due to charge screening. In contrast, BW30 retained about 50% of F at pH3, >80% at pH4, and about 99% at pH >5, due to the smaller pore size and hence a more dominant size exclusion. In consequence, only little impact of ionic strength increase was observed for BW30. The concentration of NOM in permeates of both NF270 and BW30 were typically >2mg/L. This was not affected by pH or ionic strength due to the fact that the bulk of NOM was rejected by both membranes through size exclusion. The research is carried out in the context of providing safe drinking water for rural and remote communities where infrastructure is lacking, and water quality varies significantly. While other studies focus on energy fluctuations, this research emphasises on feed water quality that affects system performance and may alter due to a number of environmental factors.

Another “Green Energy” Company Closes Doors

In the 1980’s I purchase a solar system to provide heat to my home. It worked somewhat but not to the level as was advertised. Even back then with government subsidies great claims were made about what solar power could achieve if there was just more government money invested in it. (Have we heard that recently?) And now just like back then companies took the money, made a few shrewd business people rich (?), but failed to produce the promised results. Technology has advanced since then for sure.

I like solar energy. But it must stand on its own in the market place to succeed. Clearly, at this point in time it has not.

“A green energy company heavily incentivized by Mississippi is shutting down, raising questions about whether the state will get repaid.

Solar panel maker Stion notified the state Tuesday that it would close its Hattiesburg plant Dec. 13, laying off 137 employees.click here

Solar Panels Create More Toxic Waste than Nuclear Power Plants

Decide for yourself:

“Last November, Japan’s Environment Ministry issued a stark warning: the amount of solar panel waste Japan produces every year will rise from 10,000 to 800,000 tons by 2040, and the nation has no plan for safely disposing of it.”

“Neither does California, a world leader in deploying solar panels. Only Europe requires solar panel makers to collect and dispose of solar waste at the end of their lives.” click here for full post at WUWT